Acura Legend Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Matthew is THE USER!
Joined
·
1,685 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
been having this little dispute with some friends

so to settle it... lemme ask you guys this

when a bone is broken (human bone) does it get stronger when healed? or no
explain too.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,210 Posts
not everyone heals the same and there are always lots of variables so yes and no! often times the area of the break becomes a big thick calcium knot, thats not to say it wont break right in the same place again but if it's healed completely enough secondary breaks usually happen to one side or the other of the original healed break, but not always. Breaking bones is bad mmkay, safety first.
 

·
SGM / Type F
Joined
·
3,699 Posts
There are several different kinds of fractures (transverse, oblique, spiral, longitudinal, comminuted). They all heal using th same process (osteoclast/osteoblast) but with differing results. I've read before that in certain cases bones do in fact heal to a harder density than they originally were, but there seems to be little evidence other than bone density tests to prove this. Also denser is not necessarily 'stronger' but just more rigid, a more rigid bone might actually be more likely to snap under pressure compared to a less rigid one which can 'flex' with the forces exerted (to a certain degree). Of course the only way for you to tell for sure is to break one, let it heal and try to replicate the break and see if it requires greater force ;) J/K please don't try to do that :lol:

Any doctors on here to weigh in on the question?
 

·
-Aww Dip-
Joined
·
746 Posts
There are several different kinds of fractures (transverse, oblique, spiral, longitudinal, comminuted). They all heal using th same process (osteoclast/osteoblast) but with differing results. I've read before that in certain cases bones do in fact heal to a harder density than they originally were, but there seems to be little evidence other than bone density tests to prove this. Also denser is not necessarily 'stronger' but just more rigid, a more rigid bone might actually be more likely to snap under pressure compared to a less rigid one which can 'flex' with the forces exerted (to a certain degree). Of course the only way for you to tell for sure is to break one, let it heal and try to replicate the break and see if it requires greater force ;) J/K please don't try to do that :lol:

Any doctors on here to weigh in on the question?
sounds about right. Where's Dr. Dave when you need him?
 
Joined
·
2,762 Posts
What the hell man, are you a lawyer AND a doctor? :giggle:

There are several different kinds of fractures (transverse, oblique, spiral, longitudinal, comminuted). They all heal using th same process (osteoclast/osteoblast) but with differing results. I've read before that in certain cases bones do in fact heal to a harder density than they originally were, but there seems to be little evidence other than bone density tests to prove this. Also denser is not necessarily 'stronger' but just more rigid, a more rigid bone might actually be more likely to snap under pressure compared to a less rigid one which can 'flex' with the forces exerted (to a certain degree). Of course the only way for you to tell for sure is to break one, let it heal and try to replicate the break and see if it requires greater force ;) J/K please don't try to do that :lol:

Any doctors on here to weigh in on the question?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
Of course the only way for you to tell for sure is to break one, let it heal and try to replicate the break and see if it requires greater force ;) J/K please don't try to do that :lol: QUOTE]

:rofl: Yeah like one of those jackass guys. I, however, like my bones just the way they are, intact. I've been lucky thus far, 29yrs old and have not broken a bone(I've hit many brick and concrete walls when angered too) and never have had a tooth cavity either(just chipped a molar a bit, bitting off beer tops).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,259 Posts
I'm NO Doctor, but the Mrs runs and operates a Medical Billing Company... and she's a coder herself :yes:

What I have in front of me is a STEDMAN's Medical Dictionary <=medical coding bible if you may, there are a gang of list for bone fractures; long bones, arms, elbow, wrist, skull, etc., etc.

To properly answer your question OP; "NO" (per the Mrs)... direct quote from a podiatrist Doctor.

I'll get you some more info., as soon as the Mrs is back from the office ;)
 

·
SGM / Type F
Joined
·
3,699 Posts
What the hell man, are you a lawyer AND a doctor? :giggle:
:rofl: Neither to be precise! I have a law degree and keep my license valid, but don't practice law and the other part of my degree was in biotechnology (nanomedicine to be precise). Yea I know, I'm a nerd and proud of it! :woot: :woot:
 

·
-Aww Dip-
Joined
·
746 Posts
:rofl: Neither to be precise! I have a law degree and keep my license valid, but don't practice law and the other part of my degree was in biotechnology (nanomedicine to be precise). Yea I know, I'm a nerd and proud of it! :woot: :woot:
daaaaamn!
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top