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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey people, after a, radiator, thermostat, water pump and engine replacement, my mechanic has just realised the sourse of my overheating woes. turns out the thing that the heater hose is connected to( from behind the firewall) is all twisted and also has a crack in it.
guys, i've spent tons on this car in the last 2 mths, (not that i'm complaining cause i love this car :) ) but, my mechanic says he wont touch it cause its gonna mean he has to pull down the entire dash to get to it. another guy told me i dont have to, i can fix it from under glove compartment. problem is, he didn't exactly do it himself :rolleyes: .
my mechanic came up with a temp solotion whowever, he bypassed and just joined both heater hoses together. solved the overheating problem but now i have no heat inside the car, i'm in NYC, its cold as a mofo outside.

i really dont feel like forking out doe to do this if i might be able to do this myself. HAS ANYONE EVER TRIED SUCH A REPAIR THEMSELVES????

P.S. sounds like a high price to pay to find out i have a small problem, but my previous engine had 197+++ miles on it, plus high vibration. didn't mind the change
 

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The heater is a small radiator. It is located in the Heater/Evaporator unit. The only parts exposed are the two tubes of the heater core that exit the firewall into the engine compartment. It is very unclear to me what is twisted. In the engine compartment you have the heater hoses and the heater control valve which is mounted to a bracket affixed to the firewall. If the heater core was cracked or leaking, you would have coolant dripping into the cabin and your carpets would be wet. You would also have an oily film deposited upon the inside of the windshield.

I have not yet had the pleasure of replacing a heater core in a Legend. On many Asian vehicles, the dash must be removed. The HELM does in fact state that the dash must be removed. You would also have to disconnect the A/C which means the A/C needs to be discharged and then recharged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow

thank alot fro u'r input. guess that means i'ma have to take it to the dealership or a local mechanic to get it fixed. which ever turns out to be cheaper.
i checked the helms manual and based on the diagrams it seems to be the heater core.
here's the thing though, i get no leaks on the inside. it drips coolant on the oputside and leaks steam, which is what seems to be causing my overheating.
BTW, its the pipe that comes out of the firewall that is deformed at the tip (twisted was the wrong choice of word) the mechanic tested it and also said it has a little crack( unseen to the naked eye). do u think i could repair that crack with like one of those glues that repair cracks in radiators?

thanks again :bowdown: :bowdown:
 

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The problem with radiator core sealers is that they tend to block coolant passages as well as seal the leak. I would not use it unless I planned to immediately sell the vehicle.

In terms of the heater core problem. I would do anything to avoid the labor involved in the dash removal. One thing to suggest is whether by relocating the heater hose (pushing it further onto the heater core tube nipple) you can stop the seepage. Are you absolutely sure that the tube has a hairline crack?

There are two other sources of coolant leakage difficult to spot: (1) the H20 Bypass tube connected to the thermostat base and (2) the coolant connection of the heater hose to the coolant passage tube running under the intake manifold.
 

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LPB said:
The problem with radiator core sealers is that they tend to block coolant passages as well as seal the leak. I would not use it unless I planned to immediately sell the vehicle.

In terms of the heater core problem. I would do anything to avoid the labor involved in the dash removal. One thing to suggest is whether by relocating the heater hose (pushing it further onto the heater core tube nipple) you can stop the seepage. Are you absolutely sure that the tube has a hairline crack?

There are two other sources of coolant leakage difficult to spot: (1) the H20 Bypass tube connected to the thermostat base and (2) the coolant connection of the heater hose to the coolant passage tube running under the intake manifold.
" I would not use it unless I planned to immediately sell the vehicle " and of course you would tell the potential buyer, perhaps a member, that YOU have done a flaky repair job on a crirical component of your car that YOU are trying to sell ??? ;)

Folks, here we have a prime example of what you are faced with when buying a used car, even from a member!

:mad:

RAP
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hmmmmmm

shame on you LPB :2cool: for making such a suggestion. lol....but nah, i love this car way too much to even consider selling it at this point. i called the ack dealership today, man its 1200 to replace the core. they said it definitely has to be replaced though. do u think if i try the radiator core sealer it might hold me through the winter, or until i can replace it?

its was cold today and if this is any indication of what the winter is gonna be like, i'ma have to get it fixed some how cause the seat warmers aint enough?

thanks again for the help? but i could really use some pointers on how best to handle my situation from this point on....
 

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RAP said:
" I would not use it unless I planned to immediately sell the vehicle " and of course you would tell the potential buyer, perhaps a member, that YOU have done a flaky repair job on a crirical component of your car that YOU are trying to sell ??? ;)

Folks, here we have a prime example of what you are faced with when buying a used car, even from a member!

:mad:

RAP
RAP: The question was whether to use some form of sealer. The writer appeared to be seeking an inexpensive repair. Sealers are sold and used daily. Before you jump on my back conduct a poll of repairers. Many will find no fault in their use. I, on the other hand, have never used them for the reason I posted. The bottom line is that the use of a sealer is an acceptable repair, and as such, I (and I am sure many others) would seriously consider using it vs the cost/labor associated with a core replacement especially if I were in the process of selling/trading. I don't know what planet you live on if you think that when buying a used vehicle from a private party or dealer you will be informed of every minor repair, especially whether a heater core may be on the way out. The buyer should be cognizant of the fact that a 12+ year old vehicle's heater core (not a critical/structural/safety component) is on borrowed time as well as many other parts/components which have reached or are nearing the end of their service life.
Of course, what do I know. 10+ years experience rebuilding, ASE certified before I changed careers, and an A.S in Applied Science (Autobody Repair).
 

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Blah blah blah. IMO, if you'll cheat on the small stuff, you'll cheat on the big. So, where do you draw the line?

THE IMPLICATIONS are, in your post, screw it, do a crappy repair and sell the car.

I am well aware that in the car business, and car repair business, there are less than honest and up front folks but THEY seldom, if at all, advertise that they will do a crappy repair to get by to just sell the car. At least you're up front about that on these boards, and according to you, you are in the car business.

Have it your way.

RAP
 
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