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30 deg. Celsius not Fahrenheit
Sorry I didn't use quotes, but I was refering to the original poster saying his system was blowing cold air at 30 deg.

Normal range is 36-48 deg while driving, max A/C with blower on high. To be sure I just looked at my anolog A/C thermometer that is always sticking out my register. That is were the acceptable range is. Any colder, especially on a 100 deg day indicates that it is over cooling.

Could be over charged or could have a bad pressure sensor that cycles the compressor too long or too often.

I also woudn't use "Rubbing Alcohol" as a solvent in A/C systems because it has a fairly high concentration of water which is what you are removing from the system with the vacuum pump. You are actually boiling the water out of the system because water boils at low temps when under vacuum.
If you are going to use something other than a commercial A/C sovent I would use "Denatured Alcohol"
 

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Sorry I didn't use quotes, but I was refering to the original poster saying his system was blowing cold air at 30 deg.

Normal range is 36-48 deg while driving, max A/C with blower on high. To be sure I just looked at my anolog A/C thermometer that is always sticking out my register. That is were the acceptable range is. Any colder, especially on a 100 deg day indicates that it is over cooling.

Could be over charged or could have a bad pressure sensor that cycles the compressor too long or too often.

I also woudn't use "Rubbing Alcohol" as a solvent in A/C systems because it has a fairly high concentration of water which is what you are removing from the system with the vacuum pump. You are actually boiling the water out of the system because water boils at low temps when under vacuum.
If you are going to use something other than a commercial A/C sovent I would use "Denatured Alcohol"
I'll vouch for that. Here in Alabama, my system (R134A conversion) blows at around 42deg with the ambient temp in the high 70's/low 80's. If I were to add any more refrigerant, I'm sure my pressure would have exceeded the max and would have shortened my compressor life. It blew slightly colder (about 2 degrees) back in the R12 days, but I'm completely satisfied with the conversion.
 

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I do not dissagree with anything said in this thread about swapping over but, personally I would not bother to change from R12 to R134 in an R12 designed system.

To do R12 yourself first get a freon card and become leagal to use it.

http://www.epa.gov/Ozone/title6/609/technicians/609certs.html

The cert test is easy and it only cost 15 bucks when I did it a few years ago. Once you mail if off in a few weeks a brand new freon card that allows you to by R12 and R22 will arrive in the mail.

Then go to O Riley auto parts and spend 35 bucks (yes I know to damn much but it works) for a can of R12 and just charge up your system. It will then blow sweet COLD all day long and this is from a guy living in Houston Tx where it matters.

The issue is if the evaperator is not sized right you will not get the full cold potential the system is capable of and it you have small leaks it will be a hassle from then on.

The other option is to use HC12 http://www.foxtoolsupply.com/

I buy it from this guy but a lot of folks offer it. I have been using it for 3 years now in my 2000 jeep that had 134 in it from the factory and have been very happy since I changed, gotta love the sweet COLD.

Befor then my 134 leaked out all the time and I had to rechage it every year because of 134s small monicule size where HC12 with larger molecules does not leak so much. And damn it blows cold and does not deterorate the rubber etc.

Read up on R134 "issues" and you may change you mind on using it. There are alternatives. However if you decide to sell your car switch it back to 134 or 12 as very few professionals deal with it.

http://www.foxtoolsupply.com/hc12vs.htm

This is just one link but a google search will show more.
 

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I do not dissagree with anything said in this thread about swapping over but, personally I would not bother to change from R12 to R134 in an R12 designed system.

To do R12 yourself first get a freon card and become leagal to use it.

http://www.epa.gov/Ozone/title6/609/technicians/609certs.html

The cert test is easy and it only cost 15 bucks when I did it a few years ago. Once you mail if off in a few weeks a brand new freon card that allows you to by R12 and R22 will arrive in the mail.

Then go to O Riley auto parts and spend 35 bucks (yes I know to damn much but it works) for a can of R12 and just charge up your system. It will then blow sweet COLD all day long and this is from a guy living in Houston Tx where it matters.

The issue is if the evaperator is not sized right you will not get the full cold potential the system is capable of and it you have small leaks it will be a hassle from then on.

The other option is to use HC12 http://www.foxtoolsupply.com/

I buy it from this guy but a lot of folks offer it. I have been using it for 3 years now in my 2000 jeep that had 134 in it from the factory and have been very happy since I changed, gotta love the sweet COLD.

Befor then my 134 leaked out all the time and I had to rechage it every year because of 134s small monicule size where HC12 with larger molecules does not leak so much. And damn it blows cold and does not deterorate the rubber etc.

Read up on R134 "issues" and you may change you mind on using it. There are alternatives. However if you decide to sell your car switch it back to 134 or 12 as very few professionals deal with it.

http://www.foxtoolsupply.com/hc12vs.htm

This is just one link but a google search will show more.
If you have to replace freon every year, it's because you have a leak and not because the molecules are smaller. All cars have come with R134 for 15 or so years and it does not just leak out. I have been a mechanic for 21 years and I have never seen a car just leak because it uses R134.

In most cases, there is no reason freon should leak. My wifes Tacoma is 8 years old now and never needed a recharge. My Truck is 5 years old and never needed a recharge. Both are, you guessed it, R134.

The best way to maintain your A/C is to use it. When using your defrost in the winter, you should turn the A/C on. American cars automaticaly cycle the compressor when in defrost mode. It acts as a dehumidifier and will clear windows much faster.
 

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My point is with the very small leaks that are hard to find and can be costly to fix, 134a with the smaller moleculs amplifes the problem. A higher system standared of integrety is required to hold it in. A cheap fix is use a different refrigerant less suseptable to leaking.

I found a good 134a discussion here

http://au.geocities.com/OZBRICK850/interior-r134.html
Appreciate your thoughts and link, Chomot.

We have two cars (original R12) i've fillded with Hydrocarbon - and both work extremely well. We had 41.2 deg C the other day (Melbourne,Australia).
But, i'm still slightly confused about the oil. Our dealer sold me Castrol icematic SW 100. The info tells me that it is OK for mixing with mineral (which i've got on the ex R12 systems). So far i've had no problems, but it only has been in operation for about a year.
Should i clean the system and switch back to mineral???

So far, i don't get it. Why would anyone consider R134a given that it is no good for our atmosphere, costs more, and has less cooling efficiency??? Anyone, please explain??
The danger of explosion/fire is just minimal as HC does not cause the corrosion in the evaporator as 134a does with a wet system?
In any case, what sort of explosion would you get from 300g; not that one wouldn't notice something wrong with the sulphur additive to the gas?

Well, i'm sure but not 100%. Dupont bullshit is getting to me.

Cheers
 

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The EPA has Hydrocarbon refrigerants listed as an "inappropriate replacement for R-12" due to the risk (yes, I know it's remote) of explosion. They go on to say that the risks are "unconfirmed", but even THAT is quite enough for the EPA. The higher Global Warming index of R-134a (they feel) is justified by its known safety.

As for A/C oils: mineral oil is meant for R-12, PAG oil is meant for R-134a, and ester oil will work with both. A lot of people who R-12 to R-134a conversions suggest using ester oil on the off chance that the mineral oil hasn't been completely removed from the system.
 

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hydrocarbon refrigerant safety

Hi, I have noticed two major chains here in Canada selling hydrocarbon refrigerants, canadian tire & walmart.

Walmart in particular I suspect has some pretty rigorous standards for assessing the risk posed by the products they sell. They have a lot to lose and are famous for being pretty well "lawyered up". I'd guess they do not take product liability lightly. Walmart's acceptance combined with the fact that there seems to be few incidents related to the hazards of using hc refrigerants appears to speak well for their safety.

As for the EPA, kinda seems like a suspicious person might think that it's sour grapes on their part after it was ruled they cannot ban hc refrigerants as they are non-ozone depleting and therefore out of the EPA's jurisdiction.

If anyone does find apparent safety hazards, i.e. actual events, with hc refrigerants I'd sure like to see links etc posted here.

cheers, Jay

Oh, BTW duracool is the brand sold in canada, looking at the posts above I guess my spellchecker turned duracool into duracell w/o my notice.
 

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Hello, awesome post and thanks for all the great info. I'm about to do this conversion to my 92 Acura and I'm getting ready to buy everything need , but looking on Amazon for the Schrader valve tool there are lots of different brands and sizes, could anyone point me to the right size valves I need and maybe also a good brand to go with ? Thanks in advance.
 
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