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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, it's a year later, but I'm finally halfway done swapping the JDM engine into my 1989 L sedan. Hauled the old engine out last weekend (now that the weather is half-decent here ...) and I'm in the process of transferring the transmission and intake/injector setup to the JDM engine.

Had a couple of (hopefully) minor mishaps while removing the engine: broke one of the tiny inlet pipes of the speed sensor (the one that the speedo cable goes into) and also broke one of the plastic vacuum line inlets on that vacuum "switch" on the intake system (that very small brown bake-lite looking one, with a black "cap" on it, and two vacuum lines connected to it).

So ...here's my questions: does anyone have a spare (working) speed sensor that I could "acquire"? And does anyone have that vacuum switch? In a pinch, I might be able to repair both ...perhaps epoxy the vacuum switch, and maybe run a small self-tapping brass fitting into the speed sensor. However, I think it would be best to replace them. Any help would be much appreciated!!
 

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congratulations on the swap! ill look around for the parts you need. whered you get your engine at?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! Much appreciate any help you can offer. Got the engine a year ago in February (2007) from the Canadian outlet of Tiger Japanese Auto Parts LTD - Home . I checked recently and they don't have any more JDM engines for the G1 Legends ...wonder if anyone has them anymore?
 

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dam how much did it cost you total to get it there?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I paid somewhere between $375 and $485 for it ...including shipping by truck to me from 1800 miles away!! If I recall correctly ...I think it was $375 for the engine, and $110 for shipping. They dropped it off right on my driveway.
 

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dam that sounds good to me lol.. how many miles did it have on it?
 

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Glad to hear you're finally getting work done on the swap, man! And at a price like that, definitely not something to pass up. I don't have the parts you need though =[

stock, to answer your question about mileage... JDM engines never come with an exact mileage, rather they estimate it to be 40,000 - 60,000 miles. I've heard it has something to do with Japanese emissions requiring an engine swap at that mileage interval, though I don't know if there's any validity in that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Separated the transmission from the engine this afternoon ...and stripped off most of the other engine parts that may serve as spares for future use. If I have the energy after the work is all done, I may tear the engine apart to see if I can figure out what went wrong with it ...just out of curiosity.

Next job is take off the torque converter (that stays on the engine-side once the tranny is removed.) Seems to me the easiest way to remover the TC is to lay the engine on its side, and remove the TC bolts one at a time by rotating the crank ...anyone else done this? I was toying with removing the shift solenoids and cleaning them before re-installing the tranny on the JDM engine. The tranny was shifting fine before the engine blew, so my thought is to leave well-enough alone, and not mess with something that doesn't seem to need messing with ...any advice here??
 

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Usually you remove the torque converter to flex plate bolts before removing the trans. This is done by removing the plate on the bottom of the bell housing and taking them out one at a time by turning the crankshaft to access them. That way the torque converter stays on the front of the trans which is easier on the seals. Also less trans fluid spills out. When you take the torque converter off set it over a large bucket to catch the fluid. When you put it back in put a quart or so of fluid in the torque converter and put it on the trans first. Be sure it goes all the way back and engages the oil pump on the trans. When you mount it up the torque converter should come forward a little bit to mount on the flex plate. It takes about 7 qts to fill the trans. You can add maybe 3 then after the engine has run a moment shut it down and add the rest.

Next job is take off the torque converter (that stays on the engine-side once the tranny is removed.) Seems to me the easiest way to remover the TC is to lay the engine on its side, and remove the TC bolts one at a time by rotating the crank ...anyone else done this? I was toying with removing the shift solenoids and cleaning them before re-installing the tranny on the JDM engine. The tranny was shifting fine before the engine blew, so my thought is to leave well-enough alone, and not mess with something that doesn't seem to need messing with ...any advice here??[/QUOTE]
 

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Separated the transmission from the engine this afternoon ...and stripped off most of the other engine parts that may serve as spares for future use. If I have the energy after the work is all done, I may tear the engine apart to see if I can figure out what went wrong with it ...just out of curiosity.

Next job is take off the torque converter (that stays on the engine-side once the tranny is removed.) Seems to me the easiest way to remover the TC is to lay the engine on its side, and remove the TC bolts one at a time by rotating the crank ...anyone else done this? I was toying with removing the shift solenoids and cleaning them before re-installing the tranny on the JDM engine. The tranny was shifting fine before the engine blew, so my thought is to leave well-enough alone, and not mess with something that doesn't seem to need messing with ...any advice here??
You should clean your solenoids i mean your going to have the tranny out why not right. Also change the timeing belt and water pump and any hard to reach hoses on the Jdm engine. Now everytime i put a used engine in my cars i replace the oil pump just for peace of mind you can do this if you want but you dont really have to.
 

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I realized after I left my message yesterday that you are replacing a seized engine, so of course you can't rotate the crankshaft. If need be you can leave the torque converter bolted up to the engine and disassemble it to get it to turn again. Usually, there is a bearing shell welded to the crank and once you loosen all the caps it will turn again. The problem is that sometimes a rod cap can't be reached and machinists tell me on occasion they will use some kind of cutting tool to cut a rod in half to get an engine apart.
 
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