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Hi, thank you for reading this. I've bleed the ABS system on my own car before, but I need to help a friend bleed her brakes on 93 Legend with ABS brakes. Could someone help me? What are the factory procedures? Thanks...
 

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Hmm. Factory procedures require... A special Acura specific tool to bleed the ABS system (itself... meaning the cylinders) and a proffessional injector / bleeder. The idea behind an injector / bleeder is that you are at each wheel, squeeze the gun a bit, loosen the bolt, and squeeze the gun more. Fluid doesn't tricle or barely flow out - I rushes out. The dealers use the injector / bleeders. However... you shouldn't think of ABS as any different than a standard brake bleed operation and you should also be aware of the potential ramifications....

Many people use the Master Cylinder to push the fluid through the brake lines and sure enough... within a month or so... the old Master Cylinders starts to fail. This is because new fluid has been introduced into the system and the seals inside the Master Cylinder allow blow by.

Anyways...

Roger, without specialized tools its a two person operation and ideally should be performed in a dry environment.

Basically all you need is a

10mm open/closed wrench
about 4-5 feet of 1/4 transparent air hose
catch bucket
24 oz of DOT 3 brake fluid

I suggest pumping out the old fluid in the master cylinder reservoir first and replacing with fresh new fluid.

You will need to start at the rear passenger side - support vehicle - remove wheel - attach closed end wrench to the bleeder bolt - then fit the air hose to the bleeder nipple. Ensure the air hose travel upwards and (for instance) wraps through one of the coils on the strut for support and then downwards to the catch bucket.

Have a partner apply pressure to the pedal (not like a monkey though) in a "Pump and Hold" fashion. After your partner pumps the pedal you will see the caliper compress the pads onto the rotor, then you loosen the bleeder bolt a little and you will see fluid escape into the air line. You will notice that the fuild stops rising and your partner will notice the pedal draws towards the floor board. At that time, you tighten the bolt and then have your partner pump and hold the pedal again while you repeat this process. Repeat this process until there are no bubbles coming out of the line AND until the fluid looks clean. You want the fluid coming out of the bleeder bolt to look like honey (equal to new DOT 3 fluid).

Be sure to check the fluid in the reservior and top it off frequently before, during and at the end of the process.

You will perform the bleeding in this order

Passenger rear
Driver side front
Driver side rear
Passender front

DO NOT DEVIATE FROM THIS ORDER.

The bleeder bolts have a 7lb torque if you have a wrench - otherwise, just make sure they are tightned securely and that there is NO SIGN OF FLUID COMING OUT OF THE BLEEDER BOLT WHEN THE BRAKE PEDAL IS COMPRESSED before moving onto the next wheel. And be sure to not overtighten the lugs (80lbs and in cross alternating fashion)

FYI, I started my car a couple of time during the process to help avoid cavitating the system.

I'm sure there are others that may have some to offer - and all advice is welcomed.

Good Luck.
 

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Hey KNLNGUS, great procedure.

You should copy and paste it in the DIY section.
 

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wait wait wait, from what i've learned your supposed to start with the caliper furthest away from the master cylinder, why RR, LF, LR, RF?
 

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GS Hog
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If you plan to bleed by using the pedal pump method, I recommend placing a block of wood under the pedal. The problem that causes the master cylinder to fail is the fact that when you bleed by pumping the brakes, the pedal travels more than it normally does during regular braking, and as such damages the seals and causes an internal leak. Place a block of wood under the pedal so that the pedal is unable to travel more than usual.

This cause of the internal leak happened to me when I got my 90k done at the dealer. The day after, I had to go back and replace my master cylinder.

I no longer bleed my brakes by using the pedal.
 

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if u don't bleed using the pedal method, which method do u use?
 

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GS Hog
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I use a Power Bleeder that is basically a pressurized container filled with brake fluid that is attached to the master cylinder. This pressure forces the air/old fluid out of the lines, and replaces it with new fluid at the same time. One man bleed/flush job.

I recently flushed my brake system using this method after installing stainless steel brake lines, and replaced the fluid with ATE Superblue.
 

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How crucial is the correct order when bleeding?
I just put crossdrilled rotors on my car and I had to take the the driver and pass side front calipers off in order to get the pistons back in so i could fit them over the pads.
I thought that I had bled them enough, but i notice that sometimes the pedal is mushy and sometimes it's not. Do you think i should just bleed them again?
 

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The order is not that much of a problem, but it is very common to start with the longest brakeline (which is RR) and gradually go to the shortest.

The idea off the wood-peace is very good, never press the pedal deeper than normal (except with a new main brake cylinder this is possible) :bowdown:

If you dont have the special tool for the square shaped bleeder (the long thing with the cannister on top) off the ABS high pressure system then NOT OPEN IT, the brake fluid is pressurized and will spray in your face over your car , everywhere..... :( You can suc the ABS cannister empty and refill it with new brake fluid, as you test drive on a slippery road, braking hard, the abs pump will pump it into the system, if you repaet it a few times,then it is more or less all fresh oil inside.
 

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Well, I bled the two front brakes again using the pedal method, there was some air and I but got the same result. If I'm pulling off the highway doing 70-0mph by the time I reach around 10mph the pedal feels mushy. I have to pump it to get pressure. Do you think the master cylinder is toast? Should I try and bleed all the brakes in the correct order this time?
 

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LegendGS said:
I use a Power Bleeder that is basically a pressurized container filled with brake fluid that is attached to the master cylinder. This pressure forces the air/old fluid out of the lines, and replaces it with new fluid at the same time. One man bleed/flush job.

I recently flushed my brake system using this method after installing stainless steel brake lines, and replaced the fluid with ATE Superblue.
LegendGS, Where did you buy the Power Bleeder and how much?
 

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stalker said:
Well, I bled the two front brakes again using the pedal method, there was some air and I but got the same result. If I'm pulling off the highway doing 70-0mph by the time I reach around 10mph the pedal feels mushy. I have to pump it to get pressure. Do you think the master cylinder is toast? Should I try and bleed all the brakes in the correct order this time?
 

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Question: What size is the bleeder valve in the 1991 Legend Sedan?

The car is 6k miles away so I can't just go to it and check but I want to order the
Speed Bleeder valves someone suggested.

N/M, the Speed Bleeder web site has a chart for easy ordering.

Do you think bleeding will fix my ABS code of 0, pump under-run? It only came after
replacing the master cylinder.
 
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