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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright.

I took my 92 Sedan to one shop (not a specialized a/c shop), and they checked for leaks and did a VACUUM test. Test showed that there was literally no drop in pressure (indicating no leak in system). The shop did not have any dye left to put in, so they let me decide on wether or not to go ahead and put in R-12 because the vacuum test indicated that there is a good chance that the system will hold off for the summer or so .... being the idiot that I am (also the heat was gett'n to me :) ) I went ahead and let them fill it up.

Well ... the next few days the a/c is not blowing cold air again. So I decide to go to another place that is specialized in only A/C. So the guy checks it out and gives me his advice. He did not find a leak in the system. There was only the indication that there could possibly be a leak in a few areas. So he advised that I replace a couple of O-rings on both sides of the car, dryer and it's O-rings, take off compressor and replace gasket, covert oil to R134 compatible oil, and reinstall. Then I'll be able to use R134 for much less then R-12.

Now this work is only the easy mechanical side of it, and it does not garauntee that the leak will be all taken care of but it would be $280 with parts included. The guy told me that if this does not take care of the leak then I'm looking at big bucks to fix. The problem would very well be behind the dash in the interior of my Legend, thus a $1200 job.

I really don't know if I should just dish out the $280 and take my chances, because then if it doesn't work I'm looking at $280 + $1200 = $1480 approx. just for the A/C to work. Mind you I still need to change timing belt and water pump, but I have the parts for that already.

I am almost considering selling my Legend for a type II!

I need your opinion .... please.
 

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heyyyyyy

is that not your car ?

i don't knwo i have kinda the sam problem but i dind't go to check my ac yet i just not use my ac for right now
 

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it is pretty clear that you do have a leak somewhere, they are just not sure where it is..... obviously after putting in some refrigerant the system worked again (until enough leaked out to trip out the compressor safety and leave you warm again)..skip the conversion to r134 as it involves more than just replacing the oil. A 134 system requires more refrigerant and operates at high pressures. Your current system will work if they find and fix the leak....go somewhere else. Dye testing is old technology...they have a device that sniffs out the leaks, but if they aren't certain where then the dye will be evident at the suspicious sites....but it may take a couple of weeks.....Call around to more places, these guys are not doin' the job for you.
 

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$1200 to only replace the ring behind the dash sounds kind of high to me. A couple years ago I had a shop quote me around $500 in labor to replace that same O-ring, the a/c pipe that enters the firewall, the a/c pipe that runs across near the top of the radiator, and the dryer.
 

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**** man that's cheap. I just replaced the a/c line that goes back behind the radiator. It cost me $135.00 for the part and didn't even come w/ the little o rings. Yeah i've heard $1200.00 also. What I'm confused about is why not r-134 conversion. Especially w/ a leak. Both kits together cost me $80.00. That's for the conversion kit and a kit with new rings and 9 oz bottle of r-134. Now My mechanic told me my car uses 33.5-35 oz of r-12 and that when using r-134 you use only 80% of how much r-12 you use. As for the cost of refill every time it needs recharged.... cost to mechanics is $50.00 for 1 pd of r-12 rather then $11.00 for a Pd of r-134. Also if you have a leak it would have saved you all that money of the extra money on a recharge of what the kit would have cost. Also the price of r-12 is only Going up due to **** enviromental reasons.
 

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I had the same problem with my a/c. My problem was with my a/c belt..the pully dropped out. I got it fixed and all the belts replaced for around $200 and now my a/c works fine.
 

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sealing leaks?

isn't there some kind of solution you can put into the a/c system that seals leaks and sh*t too....try that maybe before getting it recharged again....
 

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There is no way the system could hold a vacuum and lose the charge. You have a leak. The question is where. I disagree with bigdad in not changing the system over to R-134. Why recharge with expensive R-12 just to use it to locate the leak? If you do the retrofit, you should replace the receiver/drier.
 

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"isn't there some kind of solution you can put into the a/c system that seals leaks and sh*t too....try that maybe before getting it recharged again...."

This is one solution to your query.

http://refrigerants.net/co00033.htm

Use the "Stop Leak" product.

I had used their ES-12a product for almost 2 years.
Worked well, cooled my car quickly.
Pretty cheap compared to the price of R-12. :mad:
 

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I had the same problem on my 300K Legend (92 Sedan - Dead Now) at about 200K.

On the 92 Sedans (not sure about 91's or coups) the AC tube goes down and around the front of the radiator. This design was changed 93-95 -- the tube then went across the sway bar at the rear of the engine compartment. On the 92's the part of the tube that passes the lower section of the radiator gets worn from long term slight rubbing against the radiator.

I bet thats where your leak is and why its not easy to find.
This leak caused something behind the dash to go (I forget the name of part) and the entire repair was close to $1000 - at dealer - about 4 years ago- probably $1200 today.


Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Freeze 12?

Do you know if you can add Freeze 12 instead of R-12 in our Legends? ....

I've called around and heard that it is what a lot of shops use instead of the expensive R-12. Freeze 12 is around 9 or 10 bucks a lbs.

Anyone?

and thanks for all of your help!
 

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if you want to convert to r134 you should be aware that while the r134 is much cheaper, you will need to replace receiver/drier, solvent clean the entire system to remove all of the traces of the oil used with r12 system (it is not compatible with r134), change charging fittings to r134. After doing so, the higher pressures needed for effective cooling with r134 will likely cause older components in your current system to fail. the r134 is not as an effective refrigerant as r12. As noted before, testing using modern means is more effective than dye testing, mostly because it is much quicker and more sensitive, but dye testing can be helpful to identify specific leak sites. You don't need to charge the entire system with r12 dye for a test. You have a leak somewhere and that should be found and repaired and then charged with r12....in the long run, you will get it done more cheaply this way that doing the conversion....
 

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the r134 is less efficient, so a PROPER conversion requires high pressures (new compressor) and greater reservoir liquid capacity to equal the cooling ability of the r12. However, many shops don't tell you that and they simply replace the r12 with r134 after collecting any r12 from your system (they wind up using or selling it to recyclers). Many don't even solvent clean the system prior to the conversion and that will destroy the remaining components. In the meantime your system will work for a while and it will not cool as well as before with the r12. Unless you have a major failure of the entire system, like the compressor, yyou are better to fix the leak and refill with r12 as it is designed. Note following from reputable AC source.

While it is possible to retrofit R12 systems to the new gas, there are some complications.First, the lubricants used in the compressor differ and are not compatible, so the entire system must be flushed before R-134a can be installed. Second, to get adequate performance from R-134a, a higher operating pressure is required, which may require the replacement of a number of parts in the system. But R-12 is no longer being produced, so its price is climbing rapidly. In general, the rule of thumb is that if you have an older R-12 system that has developed a minor leak, it is best to replace the defective part and recharge with R-12. When the time comes to replace the expensive compressor, it is worth the trouble and expense of converting to the new, more readily-available refrigerant. In any case this is not a do-it-yourself repair; only shops with the appropriate training and recovery equipment are licensed to purchase either R-12 or R-134a
 
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