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You will know when it's bad when your brake pedal starts slowly falling to the floor when your firmly pressing on the brake pedal. They run around $130.00 and in fairly easy for a "mechanic" to install. Let a mechanic install it because it has to be properly bench bled before installing. A good mechanic can install it in only 30 minutes or less.
 

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GS Hog
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I think they're about $165 at the dealer (from memory). You know FOR SURE yours is bad when you try to stop, almost stop, and then not stop. :D

Usually, your brake pedal will sink to the floor, and you may have to pump your brakes a few times to build enough pressure to stop the car.

There are other things you'll want to look for when troubleshooting though. For example, spongy brakes indicate air in your brake lines, or fluid at your wheels may be caused by busted brake lines or bad caliper.

If everything checks out OK, and you're having trouble stopping due to your pedal sinking to the floor, chances are that you've got a bad master cylinder.

It isn't difficult to install.
 

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Yes, it will get worse. Much worse. One day you'll try to stop and the pedal will go to the floor. Pumping the brakes may help but it will be a safety issue real soon. Don't wait!

I can't answer the rebuild question - never heard of it done for that part. I suggest brand new.
 
G

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I just kinda went through this and bleeding my brakes helped massively. I found out though while doing this that my rear right caliper is busted so now I need to get a new one. I'm confident that with how much bleeding helped, the caliper should make it perfect.
 

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GS Hog
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Did it get squishy after you beld it? If so, you probably introduced air into your lines.

After bleeding your brakes, the pedal should feel tighter.

One other rather common occurance is master cylinder failure after bleeding your brakes by the pedal pump method. That's what happened to me.

What happens it that during bleeding, the piston is pushed further than it would normally travel. This can cause damage to seals inside the master cylinder; thus an internal leak.

One way to avoid this is to place a block of wood under the brake pedal that will restrict the distance the pedal travels during the bleed.

I just flushed my brakes yesterday using a
Power Bleeder. I'm only marginally happy with it primarily due to the fact that it was difficult to get a good seal on the cap (for pressurizing purposes). I think that it's a safer procedure though.
 

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Roger,
I just replaced my Master Cylinder on the fourth. My brake pedal would sometimes go down (not all the way to the floor) but it scared me enough. I was able to get a rebuilt one at Murray's on Saginaw and Waverly for 59.99 plus 35.00 core charge. It came with a lifetime (while you own the car) warranty. After I changed it, I drove the car for a good while without that problem anymore. It wasn't too hard to do--plus my Dad is a Foreign Sports Car Mechanic so he helped via the phone (he lives in Ohio). Also, no one that I know of makes a master cylinder rebuild kit for the legends. I checked as many places I could and my dad check also.

I am still testing the change because if it isn't the master cylinder then its the accumulator and that would be very expensive to fix.

good luck!
 

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Damn, what's up with this? Mine went out on the 27th of June. Right before a road trip i was taking to SF... Damn that would have been bad... 400 miles with out brakes.. :p replace it asap... Mine started going out when i picked up my friend but was working okay, then while going DOWN HILL.... It went out. :p Lucky i was fine and was able to stop and get my mech. to install it in an hour.... parts and all --=Keith
 
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