Acura Legend Forum banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am talking about the cylinder that sits between the radiator and the front bumper. It has the glass freon "view window" on top of it. It also has the HIGH valve from the A/C running from it, too. The reason I am asking is because it is leaking freon from the top of it. I tried tightening up the screws on top but it continued to leak. The part that is leaking is the assembly that has the A/C high valve and another screw beside it. That is the screw that I tried to tighten, but to no avail, it continued to leak. Any help?? Any suggestions (perferably cheap suggestions)?? Anyone??? It is a 1991 Sedan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
744 Posts
I believe you are describing the "receiver." Cylinder infront of the radiator (CONDENSOR actually)

As for suggestions about tightening down... I belive you are talking about the condensor pipe. I don't know if there is a gasket inbetween the fittings of the condensor pipe and the receiver - or how it would start leaking without being disturbed.

My initial thought would be - if the hardware is not stripped - then perhaps the bolt / screw holes are stripped. New Hardware and new receiver?

I'm hoping to hear from others about a fix.

KNLNGUS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
996 Posts
All connections in the A/C system have rubber o-rings. You can try changing the O-ring fist to see if it solves the problem. The system needs to be evacuated before ytou can open it up (don't just blow it out into the sky!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are you saying that there should be an O ring under that area where the screw was that I was trying to tighten? If you look at that cylinder, the high valve comes out on the right side of it. That area where the high valve comes out, kinds sits on top of that cylinder and there is a screw up there. Should there be an O ring under that??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,448 Posts
all A/C connectors will have a gasket or O ring at the joint for seal, unless it is a soldered/brazed connection. It sounds like a bad seal.
Do not overtighten, you can only evacuate system and replace o-rings, you probably should and will have to put in new dryer/receiver at the same time. Any time the system is opened and exposed for any length of time to atmosphere, moisture from the air will saturate the dryer and require replacement of same, not too expensive...be glad the condensor or evaporator aren't bad...they get expensive....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, everyone for your input, but is there an O ring or gasket under the area that I am talking about? Again, it is the area where the high valve comes out of that cylinder and the same piece that the high valve comes out of, there is a screw (it sits on top of the cylinder). That piece where the screw is and the high valve comes out of, is leaking under it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,106 Posts
It is the Receiver-Drier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
996 Posts
kino1161 said:
Thanks, everyone for your input, but is there an O ring or gasket under the area that I am talking about?
Yes there is ... under the line is a 1/2" O-ring. It probably needs replacing. There is also a safety valve on the side of that connection which might be leaking
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Safety valve? Where at? Keep in mind, I am talking about the area where the high valve comes out and it has a screw right there beside it on top of the receiver/drier. With that in mind, how would I actually change out the O rings on top of the receiver/drier?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
996 Posts
To replace to O-ring, you need to have the system evacuated at a shop. Once it's empty, just undo the bolt holding on the line, list it up, and you'll see the O-ring sitting around the fitting. Just replace that, make sure the area is clean all around, and reattch the line with the bolt (don't over tighten!). Then get your A/C checked for leaks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Scotch,
I think that the process that you are calling "EVACUATION" is the procedure done with a vacuum pump immediately prior to recharging with the freon. All freon should have been removed from the system before beginning the evacuation or the vacuum pump could be damaged. (At least that is what the instructiuons for my vacuum pump warn.) It is usually done at 30 HG ( if possible) for a period of from 15 minutes to 2 hours. Seems to be just a matter of personal preference.

I have seen the process that you mentioned refered to as "discharging the system". As you mentioned, it is worthwhile to have it done by someone who has the facility to recover the old freon. It is good for the environment and is also financially beneficial if you can get them to use it to recharge the A/C system. Especially, if the freon is R12.

P.S.(If I am wrong, it will not be the first time)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
996 Posts
You're probably right on the terminology ... What I'm referring to is the removal of the old freon. Now that I think about it, the shop I went to referred to the process as "recovery and evacuation" before they could recharge the system. I guess they are actually two seperate processes.

Thanks for the FYI ... hope I didn't confuse anyone!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks, guys! So, have my system "evacuated/vacuumed". Then, undo the screw next to where the high valve line comes out. Lift up the high valve line and I should see the O rings sitting there? Am I correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks, ScotcH!!! Now, when when I loosen up that screw next to the high valve, does the high valve just come out of the drier? I see how I can replace the O ring for that screw, but what about the high valve O ring? Does the high valve just pop out for me to replace the O ring there? You are really helping me a lot!!! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
996 Posts
Here is a very crude drawing of what all the AC fittings work like. Basically, the bolt just holds the two halves together, and the O-ring goes around the nipple that fits into a hole on the other half. This should give you a good idea of what you can expect to find. I would guess the top of the dryer is like the bottom piece in the drawing

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
I'm going to throw in my 2 cents, I have just converted my 93 R-12 to R-134a.

The A/C system is under high pressure!!. It could explode if you do not evacuate and at worst, KILL you.

As other have said, you need to recover all the old refridgerant.
Venting it is a $25,000 fine by the EPA. :(

Once evacuted, you can open the system. No need to vacuum, as you will be "opening" the system up once you remove the HI side (discharge) pipe.

You should really change the rec./dryer one the system is opened.
Cost $50 CDN at Napa. The 91-93 with R-12 DO NOT use the same dryer as the 93-95 with R-134a.

Before you change the 2 O rings, soak them in a little mineral oil.
Coat the little white washers/spacer on the HI/LO lines with oil also.

Put 1/3 oz of mineral oil into the dryer (as per service manual).

What you should do is put the bracket around the dryer and tighten it up to the condenser bracket.
Leave the 10mm bolt to the left a little loose so you can pull up or push down the dryer.

Pull the rubber sealer cap off the dryer and line up the hoses and the two little "nibs" that ensure that the hoses go where they should. Push the dryer up and tighten up the 10mm bolt on the backet, so that it holds the dryer in place. Tighten up the LO and HI side 10mm bolts (don't wale on the bolts as it is the O rings that make the seal - tightening up on the bolts will not do anything, only strip the threads)

Do not put on the dryer and leave it. :mad:
The function of the dryer, is just that, to DRY out any moisture in the system. The desectant in the dryer will soak up the moisture from the air.
Put the dryer on and take it directly to your A/C tech and get a vacuum pulled for atleast 1/2 hr.

I put mine on in the mechanic's parking lot (no more than 20mins) and then go him to pull a vacuum and refill with "virgin" R-134a.

FYI: When I say pull a vacuum, what that means, is to drop the pressure in the A/C system so that the moisture in the lines will boil to vapour and the vacuum pump will lterally pull it out (of the A/C system). The longer the vacuum, the better.

Once all the air is out of the system, you have to wait a little while to ensure that the system is holding the vacuum.
ie not letting in any air.
If it holds the vacuum, then you can add the R-12/R-134a, if not, then you have a leak and you must find it.

Sorry for the essay, I just revamped mine, so I hope my experience will help you and some other members.

Good luck.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top