Acura-legend.com banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've searched and not found many good answers.

When you twist the rear pistons clockwise, about how far do you want to go?

Also, rear pads were down to nothing, but the pistons were out to compensate. So does that mean that it will slowly turn out so it's at the right distance from the rotor or something?

Because I just changed the rear pads and the E-Brake, which was tight even with the old pads, is looser now. Would this be because the piston needs to come out some?

Any help at all would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Even with regular braking it's not as hard as it should be.
Time to bleed the brakes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Oh yeah you turn the pistons all the way back....
Talked to my Ex-Mechanic step brother, he said all the way in, which they are.
Did a brake check today at 40, locked them all up good, rear as well and left some nice black tread about 15 feet long. Rears too, so normal braking seems fine.

Time to bleed the brakes?
Asked step bro to test brakes, and like I thought, the brake pedal when the car is running is mushy, and from what I read on the forum here, it may be time for a new master cylinder.

And the brakes are bled holymoo. I'm going to get new dot 3 though and re-bleed them all. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
are you losing fluid? if so, have you ever had the master cylinder completely dry? and if so, have you bled the master cylinder?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
I think this is all over the forum...but when you bleed the brakes you have to bleed them a lot to get the pedal hard again...i think I cycled thru mine 5 or 6 times before the pedal was rock hard...

and did you follow the correct bleeding order outlined in the service manual?
 

·
-------------------------
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
The piston will be very hard to turn but you do need to turn it all the way in to install the new pads. There is a special tool I found at Sears which is basically a cube w/ 3/8" fittings. Each side has different metal bits sticking out which fit into the piston grooves and makes turning the piston a LOT easier.

Bleeding the brakes also has to be done in the correct order (pass front, driver rear, pass rear, driver front IIRC, but it's been a little while). If you apply constant pressure to the brake pedal do you eventually bottom out? If so it's probably time for a new master cylinder (unless there is a visible leak elsewhere). If you bottom out and pump the brakes, does the pedal gain pressure back?

Also, if you go through the trouble of bleeding your brakes, it's a good idea to get all the old fluid out and not just stop when the air bubbles stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,604 Posts
The piston will be very hard to turn but you do need to turn it all the way in to install the new pads. There is a special tool I found at Sears which is basically a cube w/ 3/8" fittings. Each side has different metal bits sticking out which fit into the piston grooves and makes turning the piston a LOT easier.

Bleeding the brakes also has to be done in the correct order (pass front, driver rear, pass rear, driver front IIRC, but it's been a little while). If you apply constant pressure to the brake pedal do you eventually bottom out? If so it's probably time for a new master cylinder (unless there is a visible leak elsewhere). If you bottom out and pump the brakes, does the pedal gain pressure back?

Also, if you go through the trouble of bleeding your brakes, it's a good idea to get all the old fluid out and not just stop when the air bubbles stop.
Check out the second tool from the top:

K&D Disc Brake: Pad Spreader, Adjusting-Fixture, Piston-Tools

Here's another handy tool that I need to get. I've seen them for under $10...

Honda / Acura Fuel Filter Banjo Bolt Socket (SCH89800)
 

·
-------------------------
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top