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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone here put their own rotors on, because I'm trying to save myself some $$$...........Holla Back
 

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Five- O
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I've changed all 4 rotors on my g1 coupe recently with brembo crossed drilled ones i got from Jose3030.

It's a really easy job to do yourself.
This is off the top of my head- so I may miss something.

1- I jacked up the entire front of the car using the tow hook and removed the tires.

2- remove the two caliper screws.
3- slide the caliper off the brake pads.
4-remove the two brake pads.
5- remove the two screws from the brake pad bracket (Not sure of it's name but - it's the metal braket where the brake pads slide into).
6- Now it gets alittle harder because of time and rust. remove two philip head screws located on the center hub of the rotor.
If these are u're factory rotors and have never been removed you will have a very hard time removing the screws. Try very carefully to remove the screws with a large screw driver, but becareful not to strip the screws. I couldn't get my mine off so I went to sears and got an impact driver for $20 ( It's like a fat screw driver with different heads and you hit the end with a hammer- as u hit the end the head turns a little). It took me a few hits but I got all the screws off without any problem.

7- ok now it's time to remove the rotors themselves. This is also a pain in the ass b/c they are lodged in there with years of corrosion. I used alot of the wd40 sprayed into the two screw holes in the center of the rotor. (I'm not sure if there's a rotor removal tool but I think I did it the old fashion way.
I used a 3 lb mallet and short thick piece of wood.
I used the wood as a buffer between the mallet and the rotor.
I gave the rotor several wacks in the center hub part (It may seem like your hammering the rotor in, but it helps to unlodge it).
Mine were so lodged in that I had to hammer the inner portion of rotor out. (where the pads sits- Use the wood as a buffer)
After sometime I was able to get rotors off.

8- now it's easy- Put in the new rotor. I suggest u put some antiseize cream on the back of the center hub so that the removal will easier. Slide the rotor in place and screw in the two screws. These screws are not mounting screws they are there to hold the rotor in place (they aren't really needed b/c the wheel lug nuts hold everything together).
My front rotors slid into place very easily but on the rears I noticed that they did not lay flat- I thought the rotors were warped but I was wrong. I had to slide the rotors as far in as possible and then use two lug nuts to get the rotor in place. After the rotor was in place i installed the two screws.

9- now just re-install the brake pad braket. and slide your new pads into place. Try and slide the caliper over the pads but you will most likely need to compress the caliper cylinder. For the fronts just use a C clap and flat thin object. Place the flat thin object over the cylinder and attacht the c-clap. Tighten the c-clap so that the caliper cylinder gets pushed back in. Go really slowly and have someone keep an eye on the brake fluid level- don't want have a spill over.
For the rears the caliper cylinder has to be screwed back in. Look at the brake cylinder on the rears and you will a see cross shape grooves. Take some thin pliers, place them in the grooves and turn the cylinder clock wise. It's a little of a pain but not too bad. Turn it a little and see if it fits.

10- now just screw the two caliper bolts back on and your done.

ohhh if your using new pads don't forget to put some of the anti- squeaking cream on the back of pads before installation. That will keep them quiet.

Hope this helps and someone correct me if I missed something.
Esti
 

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I changed mine on my G2. Easiest thing ever.
Make sure to hammer your screw driver into the screws when undoing the ones that hold the rotors on. They are very soft and will strip out easily.
You do need a second person to help bleed the system... well, it helps.
BTW, all I used was my stock jack and lug wrench, screwdriver and a $10 set of sockets that I had lying around. You don't need anything special to do this. MAYBE a length of pipe as a breaker bar to loosen bolts holding the calipers on.
 

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Esti said:
I couldn't get my mine off so I went to sears and got an impact driver for $20 ( It's like a fat screw driver with different heads and you hit the end with a hammer- as u hit the end the head turns a little).
An Impact Driver is a must. Take this advise and save yourself alot of time frustration:eek:. Plus you will have a cool tool to add to your tool box.
 

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SeaSickLegend said:


An Impact Driver is a must. Take this advise and save yourself alot of time frustration:eek:. Plus you will have a cool tool to add to your tool box.
Exactly, I used my old trusty imapact driver, and with 1 tap with a hammer on each phillips screw, the tow phillips screws loosen right up. Also, to remove the actual rotor from the hub, you simple use a 12mm bolt in one of the other two bolt holes on the rotor and the easily breaks any rust bond within seconds. Everything after that just slips right out and slips right back on.
 

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How come no one has mentioned torque specs and / or the use of a torque wrench.

While I totally agree that this job can be accomplished without using torque specs - I myself wouldn't think of removing my rim (much less any other bolt / nut) without a torque wrench because eventually you will have to tighten everything down. And **** if you bust the head off a bolt during your job because your bolt that required 29lbs ended up getting 50lbs because you don't know your own strenght - you will then have fun buying a drill and tap set (only 5.00 from loes or home depot), getting out your drill and having some fun fun fun!

IN ADDITION

you will (most likely) warp your nice new brembos or OE rotors if your lugs are not torque'd to 80lbs EVENLY. Now, if you can guage what 80lbs on a lug feels like (and do this on every lug) - than you are all that.

KNLNGUS.
 

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cheap

whip.....how much are you trying to spend i got a hookup at a shop if you wana do it cheap...have to come over to VA...but i could save you some $$$$
 

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KNLNGUS said:
How come no one has mentioned torque specs and / or the use of a torque wrench.

While I totally agree that this job can be accomplished without using torque specs - I myself wouldn't think of removing my rim (much less any other bolt / nut) without a torque wrench because eventually you will have to tighten everything down. And **** if you bust the head off a bolt during your job because your bolt that required 29lbs ended up getting 50lbs because you don't know your own strenght - you will then have fun buying a drill and tap set (only 5.00 from loes or home depot), getting out your drill and having some fun fun fun!

IN ADDITION

you will (most likely) warp your nice new brembos or OE rotors if your lugs are not torque'd to 80lbs EVENLY. Now, if you can guage what 80lbs on a lug feels like (and do this on every lug) - than you are all that.

KNLNGUS.
Oh yea, that too. I have the OEM helm service manual will all the torque specs and I torque each bolt that is given a specific torque in the manual :) I think we just forgot to mention it since we were mostly talking about removal.
 

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ChrisK, judging from the content of your posts - I stand to gain more information concerning the Legend from you than you do from me.

I just wanted to hit home to those out there with a haynes and $50.00 in tools the importance of torque specs.


ChrisK - to bite off of your post...

In case you are wondering where you are going to get a 12mm bolt...

FYI, for those of you out there that are having trouble removing your G2 stock OE rotors - ONCE - you have removed the 2 screws that secure the rotors onto the hub. Instead of grabing a piece of wood and hammer to loosen it from the hub - this is what I want you to do...

Take both bolts off one side of the stiffner in your engine bay and screw the bolts into the screw type holes (not the holes where the phillips head screws came out of) and do this in an even pattern. The rotor will separate from the hub with ease just like ChrisK said.

KNLNGUS.
 

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Good correction - I knew there had to be an easier way b/c wacking it with the mallet was a real pain :D
Always learning.

Thanks
Esti
 

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HAVE A QUESTION

Got my rotors/pads last year from Mr. WOOD @ Raceconcept but I have to ask the question of which way should my slots/x-drill face.

should it look like / / / /
or
should it look like \ \ \ \
on the top of the rotor
I am installing them tomorrow and I also wanted to know how hard is it to install the stainless steel brake lines as well. My "tech" guy told me that he has seen some problems with people doing it wrong.
Please let me know,
Thanks,
Mark
 

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Re: HAVE A QUESTION

Eye Candy said:
Got my rotors/pads last year from Mr. WOOD @ Raceconcept but I have to ask the question of which way should my slots/x-drill face.

should it look like / / / /
or
should it look like \ \ \ \
on the top of the rotor
I am installing them tomorrow and I also wanted to know how hard is it to install the stainless steel brake lines as well. My "tech" guy told me that he has seen some problems with people doing it wrong.
Please let me know,
Thanks,
Mark
Say we are looking at the front drivers side rotor, You will want to mount it like this ////. You are creating a centrifugal pump through the vanes to expel gasses (Heat) out of and away from the rotor. By dong this they are kept cooler. That is why you will have less if any brake fade with your new rotors.
 

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KNLNGUS said:


ChrisK - to bite off of your post...

In case you are wondering where you are going to get a 12mm bolt...

FYI, for those of you out there that are having trouble removing your G2 stock OE rotors - ONCE - you have removed the 2 screws that secure the rotors onto the hub. Instead of grabing a piece of wood and hammer to loosen it from the hub - this is what I want you to do...

Take both bolts off one side of the stiffner in your engine bay and screw the bolts into the screw type holes (not the holes where the phillips head screws came out of) and do this in an even pattern. The rotor will separate from the hub with ease just like ChrisK said.

KNLNGUS.
Those are the bolts I used myself :) All this time I thought those release bolt holes where 10mm and that I could use the smae screws that hold the rotor on, but boy was I suprised when I attampted to take of my first rotor :( I looked around for a good bolt but I had none, then I decided to try and use the strut tower brace bolt that you mentioned and it was a perfect fit :) Anyway, be careful with that bolt though because I did end up stripping the bolt by the time I was done. Those rotor holes are usually filled with dirt and rust that by the end of my job the 12mm bolt tread was stripped enough where I needed to get a new one. So, of you have a spare 12mm bolt laying around, I would used that one first.
 

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Re: Re: HAVE A QUESTION

SeaSickLegend said:


Say we are looking at the front drivers side rotor, You will want to mount it like this ////. You are creating a centrifugal pump through the vanes to expel gasses (Heat) out of and away from the rotor. By dong this they are kept cooler. That is why you will have less if any brake fade with your new rotors.
Thanks, that's what I thought, but I say a civic today with it facing the other way and it confused me:confused:
 

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Re: Re: Re: HAVE A QUESTION

Eye Candy said:


Thanks, that's what I thought, but I say a civic today with it facing the other way and it confused me:confused:
That's because Civic boys dont ask questions like you and me.
They half ass it.
:)
 

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The pattern on the rotor itself doesn't make any difference. It is the internal vents. Sometimes these vents are directional, and in that case it needs to face towards the back as described above, but the drilled or slotted pattern makes no real difference at all. For example, take a look at cars that come drilled as OEM like the Porche, Ferrari, and other cars. You will find that differnt car manufacturers have the drilled pattern facing different ways. However, I bet that the internal direction of the vetns are all facing toward the back. Also, have you ever seen those aftermarket rotors that have the drilled and slotted pattern facing both ways like this / \ ? Anway, the Legend rotor is not a direction vented rotor, so it really doesn't matter. Some people say that the bottom of the slot or drilled pattern should hit the pad first, but I don't know about that. Either way, I mounted mine the eay described above as well.
 

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The rotor removal bolt is actually 8 by 1.25 mm
asian cars use 12mm heads for these, europeans use 13mm heads. So you could use a bolt from the old beetle out back, or if you have a volvo, the frt seat bolts are 12mm in the front and 13mm in the back. Bottom line, buy a 12mm bolt and you'll get something the size of a spark plug (14mm by 1.5)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Re: cheap

95coupe said:
whip.....how much are you trying to spend i got a hookup at a shop if you wana do it cheap...have to come over to VA...but i could save you some $$$$
What's the going price and I'll give you an idea of how much I'm working with?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
KNLNGUS said:
How come no one has mentioned torque specs and / or the use of a torque wrench.

While I totally agree that this job can be accomplished without using torque specs - I myself wouldn't think of removing my rim (much less any other bolt / nut) without a torque wrench because eventually you will have to tighten everything down. And **** if you bust the head off a bolt during your job because your bolt that required 29lbs ended up getting 50lbs because you don't know your own strenght - you will then have fun buying a drill and tap set (only 5.00 from loes or home depot), getting out your drill and having some fun fun fun!

IN ADDITION

you will (most likely) warp your nice new brembos or OE rotors if your lugs are not torque'd to 80lbs EVENLY. Now, if you can guage what 80lbs on a lug feels like (and do this on every lug) - than you are all that.

KNLNGUS.
Funny you should mention that cause of my not knowing my own strength, i broke 3 studs.
 
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