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I'van der Rohe
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
im Teaching my self to read and speak japanese and right now im at the point where ican hold up a convcwersation for a very berief(im totally blank i cant remember how to spell it) time. but reading is another story. i can read Kanji and translate i can Read hiragana and roughly translate small parts of it but.....THAT DAMMED KANJI BOY IS IT A BLIZITCH to learn some body know a site that can help speed it along or someone who knows it.

Watashi wa Helms wa doko desu ka. HEHE
(you never ordered it. smarts...)
 

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Hey how long have you been learning for? I was thinking of learning it myself too.
 

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I'van der Rohe
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Avarice said:
Hey how long have you been learning for? I was thinking of learning it myself too.
i started on and off around this past Christmas. got some Japanese Mangas (Wangan Midnight) and started reading KATAKANA.
sugesstion, start wiht Katakana, its the easiest and it directly translates to english. I wish you luck and you beter not beat me to learning Kanji:D j/k

NE BODY KNOW OF ANY SITES THOUGH. Kanji is the Picto-graph writing of the japanese language (like CHINESE).
 

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Hiragana and Katakana are definitely easier. The best way to learn Kanji is buy a book with various characters (like a kanji dictionary) and start writing. One of the toughest things about kanji is that pronunciation and meaning change with the context in which the characters are used. Kanji dictionaries are organized by number of strokes. So, you can very easily start with "ichi" (a single stroke character) and move on to more difficult characters.
Bottom line.... practice, practice, practice.

Another tool for learning, look for Japanese books and magazines that include "Furigana". Furigana is the term used for the small Hiragana characters written next to Kanji. The Furigana shows how the character is pronounced.


Watashi wa Helms wa doko desu ka. HEHE
(you never ordered it. smarts...) [/B]


What are you trying to say here. Are you trying to ask "where to buy a Helms"? If so, it makes more sense to say it like this...

Helms o doko de kaimasu ka?
 

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I'van der Rohe
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Re: Re: Somebody have any REALLY good sites to learn kanji

katonk said:


What are you trying to say here. Are you trying to ask "where to buy a Helms"? If so, it makes more sense to say it like this...

Helms o doko de kaimasu ka?
:eek: you dont have to blow my spot up. i think i said....uh....where is my Helms. damm you put my inaccuracies on blast like sheit LOL

thanks for the web site... also i found www.Kanjistep.com
 

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I'van der Rohe
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
hmmmm......THIS IS GETTING MORE DIFFICULT BY THE HOUR. Im getting all frumpy. i think i should wait till this lady i know comes back from Japan. i should have asked her to pic me up somim from japan, i messed up.

self laerners of JAPANESE BEWARE OF THE DREADED KANJI..dun dun DUNNNNN...
 

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yeah kanji is hard to learn. I took japanese I and II in hawaii. My teacher would always pick on me to translate the "flash" cards
 

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Sorry, didn't mean to blow things up. I've been studying off and on for a while. Don't get much practice these days since my grandparents have passed away.

Actually, you were pretty close. What you should have said was," Watashi no Helms was doko desu ka?" Particles (wa, ga, ni, de, no, to, etc.) can be as confusing as Kanji.

Flash cards were a big help for me. You should also check out the books available at Barnes & Noble or Borders. They've usually got a few.

I purchased my Kanji-English dictionary at Kinokuniya bookstore in SF Japantown. They've got a good selection of learning books. If Kinokuniya has a location near you, I'd recommend looking through their shelves for something that works for you.
 

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I think Kanji is based on Chinese and thus many of the characters are very similar. A girl I'm dating right now speaks fluent Japanese and we were discussing this the other night.

I studied Chinese for a while and spent some time living in Hong Kong. I give anyone credit who is attempting to learn either Kanji or Chinese...it is definitely not something that will come easily and quickly to anyone above the age of 8 or 9 years. A whole lot of repetition is required.

Also, Japanese grammer as a whole is more complex than Chinese grammer...so that's a fun bonus too!

Good luck!
 

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Yes, Kanji and Chinese characters are one and the same. Hence the reason why native speakers of Chinese can pick-up a Japanese newspaper and get the gist of the articles. I think Korea also uses Chinese characters in their literature too.
 

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I'van der Rohe
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
katonk said:
Watashi no Helms was doko desu ka?"
oh YEAH thats what was wrong, i thought i had put "no" in there to conotate(sic?) the posessive of Helms. man it makes a big difference ne?

i thought the Korean writing had its own set of picto graphs. you know. The BIG Circles in Korean writing give it away to me. you know those circle usually off tothe left of one picto-graph. its like that little O is in every character.
 

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Just as Hiragana and Katakana are unique to Japanese writing, the "circular" characters used by Koreans are unique. But I've been told that in some cases, Koreans use Chinese characters too.
 
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