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Yep neutral w/ ebrake and curb kissing is the best combination. But if you insist on using a gear, the 1st gear is the best and the 6th gear the worst for "braking" purpose. It'll still roll though given enough effort/gravity since that's how some of us can push start a car with a drained battery.
btw it was also a safety issue back in the day when we didn't have to depress the clutch before cranking; where it could literally lunge forward. It can still happen in today's car though if we're not careful.
 

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jigga622 said:
i heard 1st and i've also heard second...disadvantages or advantages? thanks
After the car comes to a complete stop, I use the hand brake first to stop and settle down the car then engaging the clutch in 1st gear. It's just a habbit, I guess.

regards,

___________
eddie
95 ls 6sp
 

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I would say eddie response is applicable to all automatic and manual vehicles.

It pains me to see someone park on a hill and then they slap the bi~atch in park and the car rocks back and forth. And then you will hear them cranck down on the ebrake. I do not pretend to know what stress (in a automatic) that is action gives the internals but I can tell you it does not look good and...

In a 6 speed I would say this action would stress the flywheel first and that would be the majority of movement followed by the internals of the differential because with a gear engaged... the play or free movement will most likely be the result of the differential output shaft wear and differential box wear.

In a 5 speed you would stress the sprung friction disc and then the internals.

KNLNGUS
 

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KNLNGUS said:
I would say eddie response is applicable to all automatic and manual vehicles.

It pains me to see someone park on a hill and then they slap the bi~atch in park and the car rocks back and forth. And then you will hear them cranck down on the ebrake. I do not pretend to know what stress (in a automatic) that is action gives the internals but I can tell you it does not look good and...

In a 6 speed I would say this action would stress the flywheel first and that would be the majority of movement followed by the internals of the differential because with a gear engaged... the play or free movement will most likely be the result of the differential output shaft wear and differential box wear.

In a 5 speed you would stress the sprung friction disc and then the internals.

KNLNGUS
TAHT IS EXACTLY WHAT I WAS GOING TO SAY!
I hate that too.
Always take the weight off your internals by using your E-brake, and where applicable a curb...but not str8 up...cut it towards the street (facing up) and towards the curb (downhill).

Save some $$$$ later on
 

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KNLNGUS said:
I would say eddie response is applicable to all automatic and manual vehicles.

It pains me to see someone park on a hill and then they slap the bi~atch in park and the car rocks back and forth. And then you will hear them cranck down on the ebrake. I do not pretend to know what stress (in a automatic) that is action gives the internals but I can tell you it does not look good and...
Yes, that's the best way to save wear & tear on the parking pawl mechanism. Just because we shifted into Park does not mean all is well since it still has to find a spline to latch itself onto.


In a 6 speed I would say this action would stress the flywheel first and that would be the majority of movement followed by the internals of the differential because with a gear engaged... the play or free movement will most likely be the result of the differential output shaft wear and differential box wear.

In a 5 speed you would stress the sprung friction disc and then the internals.
KNLNGUS
Enlighten me if you will, but I think the clutch assembly & flwheel would be spared of any abnormal wear & tear (aside from slipping into a tight parking spot) regardless if it's a 5sp/6sp car.
The point made earlier about 6th gear(even 5th,4th,etc) being the worst for steep hill parking is that it'll roll just as easy as if it was left in neutral w/o ebrake on.
 

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Well, I won't discount 6/5/4 gear roll - HOWEVER - I will say that when there is no pressure applied to the clutch pedal your clutch friction disc is fully compressed by the splines or fingers of the pressure plate ON TO the flywheel.

Being that the 6 speed has a dual mass sprung flywheel... any movement not engaged by the engine while the trans is locked into a gear will cause stress to that flywheel before any back and forth (or actual vehicle movement) will occur.

In other words, the 6 speed flywheel will reach its shock absorbing limits and then movement can be transfered to the differential.

KNLNGUS
 

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For a manual transmission, 1st is the second choice with reverse the gear of preference. The whole purpose of doing this is for safety in case of brake failure. It will allow the compression of the engine to hold the vehicle in place. The lower the gear, the stronger the hold.

You should pull the emergency brake, let the car settle into position and then release the clutch with the car in reverse. This way there is no stress on the drivetrain unless the brakes can't hold the car. Of course, you should also curb the wheels; which way depends on whether or not there is a curb and which direction you are facing. No curb, position the wheels to the right so that the car goes onto the shoulder should the car roll. With a curb, position the wheels to the right facing downhill and to the left going uphill so that the wheel is blocked by the curb should the car try to roll. This all assumes you are parallel parked on the right side of the road.

Learned all of this driving a VW Beetle in SF in the early 70's. Anyone remember Bill Cosby's monolugue about learning to drive in a VW on the hills of SF. Well that was me.

Bob
 

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KNLNGUS said:
HOWEVER - I will say that when there is no pressure applied to the clutch pedal your clutch friction disc is fully compressed by the splines or fingers of the pressure plate ON TO the flywheel.

KNLNGUS
Clearly that's not what damages the flywheel, right? Since the disc is always pressed against the flywheel even in neutral.
 

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Bobchad said:
For a manual transmission, 1st is the second choice with reverse the gear of preference. The whole purpose of doing this is for safety in case of brake failure. It will allow the compression of the engine to hold the vehicle in place. The lower the gear, the stronger the hold.

Bob
Yep that's perfectly fine assuming that the motor has good compression and doesn't have a slipping clutch.;) Anyone with dubbs care to share their curbing experience. :eek:
 

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Nathan_Rd said:

Yep that's perfectly fine assuming that the motor has good compression and doesn't have a slipping clutch.;) Anyone with dubbs care to share their curbing experience. :eek:
If you have these two problems I guess you are SOL. It's still better than nothing and about the only thing you can do.
 

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Bobchad said:

Anyone remember Bill Cosby's monolugue about learning to drive in a VW on the hills of SF. Well that was me.

Bob
St. Peter - "How did you die?"
Bill - "Me and a Volkswagen drifted into the Bay..."
St. Peter - "You go to hell!"

Bill Cosby is the best! I still love his story about taking his driver's test in Fat Albert's car!
 

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You got it Katonk.

Don't forget the part about having to stop on the intersection, otherwise you kill the car.

Cosby - Looking over his shoulder yelling "go around idiot go around". Course the guy behind can't hear you because he's too busy looking over his shoulder yelling at the guy behind him "go around idiot, go around".

And of course there is the Lombard Street monologue. It's not bad enough that the streets go straight up and down, they have to put curves in the road and flowers were they buried the guys that didn't make it.

Bob
 

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Nathan_Rd - you are right in that without input to the clutch pedal - regardless of what gear (nuetral or otherwise) your friction disc is pressed against the flywheel.

It does wear the dual mass sprung flywheel because your load is transfered clockwise and counterclockwise under dead weight.

Now, when your driving your 6 speed and she bucks like wild horse (back and forth) you better believe your flywheel is the first thing to feel the stress.

What typically damages the flywheel (6 or 5 speed) is clutch / friction disc slipping which results in heat spots which leads to excessive uneven heating and cooling THUS causing a warp (or a chirp to be heard)

KNLNGUS
 
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